Diff for /books/www/chapters/appa.html between versions 1.3 and 1.4

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 <P>The best way to get a working  <!--INDEX precompiled versions for downloading -->  <!--INDEX downloading:precompiled versions -->  <!--INDEX Mozilla:precompiled versions, downloading --> version of Mozilla quickly is to download a precompiled binary for your platform. If you go to the mozilla.org homepage, you will find links to Mozilla's most recent stable milestone build for each platform and a link to the nightly development snapshot builds. These binaries come as compressed archives or with an installer, and you can use either to run Mozilla on your computer within a few minutes. These binaries don't include the source for Mozilla (unless you count the XUL, CSS, and JavaScript that made up the front end, which are always available), so read on if you want to obtain the code.  <P>The best way to get a working  <!--INDEX precompiled versions for downloading -->  <!--INDEX downloading:precompiled versions -->  <!--INDEX Mozilla:precompiled versions, downloading --> version of Mozilla quickly is to download a precompiled binary for your platform. If you go to the mozilla.org homepage, you will find links to Mozilla's most recent stable milestone build for each platform and a link to the nightly development snapshot builds. These binaries come as compressed archives or with an installer, and you can use either to run Mozilla on your computer within a few minutes. These binaries don't include the source for Mozilla (unless you count the XUL, CSS, and JavaScript that made up the front end, which are always available), so read on if you want to obtain the code.
 <P>Under the relevant license terms, the Mozilla source code is freely available to anyone who has an Internet connection and a desire to explore. You may want to look at this code out of curiosity or dive into the code as you figure out how it works and can be improved. Whatever your reasons are for looking at the Mozilla source, it is not much more difficult to get the code and build it yourself than it is to download the precompiled binaries. To get started, you need to know a few things about how to get and use the source.  <P>Under the relevant license terms, the Mozilla source code is freely available to anyone who has an Internet connection and a desire to explore. You may want to look at this code out of curiosity or dive into the code as you figure out how it works and can be improved. Whatever your reasons are for looking at the Mozilla source, it is not much more difficult to get the code and build it yourself than it is to download the precompiled binaries. To get started, you need to know a few things about how to get and use the source.
 <H2>Getting the Source Code</H2>  <H2>Getting the Source Code</H2>
<P>You can get the Mozilla  <!--INDEX source code:obtaining -->  <!--INDEX Mozilla:source code:obtaining --> source code in a few different ways. Depending on what you are interested in doing, one method may work better for you than another. This appendix provides basic information about how to get the source, but you can also find information about this topic on the Mozilla site at <A HREF="http://www.mozilla.org/source.tml">http://www.mozilla.org/source.tml</A><I>.</I><P>You can get the Mozilla  <!--INDEX source code:obtaining -->  <!--INDEX Mozilla:source code:obtaining --> source code in a few different 
 ways. Depending on what you are interested in doing, one method may work better for you than another. This appendix provides basic 
 information about how to get the source, but you can also find information about this topic on the Mozilla site at <A HREF="http://www.mozilla.org/source.html">http://www.mozilla.org/source.html</A><I>.</I>
 <P>If you want to look at the source code and don't intend to recompile it, experiment with it, or update it at all, the best way to get at the source is to browse the Mozilla code base with Mozilla Cross Reference (LXR). As you can see in <A HREF="#73085">Figure A-1</A>, LXR is a web-based source code browsing tool located at <I><A HREF="http://lxr.mozilla.org">http://lxr.mozilla.org</A></I>. LXR is also hooked up to other tools, such as Bonsai (<I><A HREF="http://bonsai.mozilla.org">http://bonsai.mozilla.org</A></I>) and the various tinderboxen (<I><A HREF="http://tinderbox.mozilla.org/showbuilds.cgi">http://tinderbox.mozilla.org/showbuilds.cgi</A></I>). Together, these tools create a powerful code maintenance system that is used widely by Mozilla developers.  <P>If you want to look at the source code and don't intend to recompile it, experiment with it, or update it at all, the best way to get at the source is to browse the Mozilla code base with Mozilla Cross Reference (LXR). As you can see in <A HREF="#73085">Figure A-1</A>, LXR is a web-based source code browsing tool located at <I><A HREF="http://lxr.mozilla.org">http://lxr.mozilla.org</A></I>. LXR is also hooked up to other tools, such as Bonsai (<I><A HREF="http://bonsai.mozilla.org">http://bonsai.mozilla.org</A></I>) and the various tinderboxen (<I><A HREF="http://tinderbox.mozilla.org/showbuilds.cgi">http://tinderbox.mozilla.org/showbuilds.cgi</A></I>). Together, these tools create a powerful code maintenance system that is used widely by Mozilla developers.
 <P><CENTER><IMG SRC="foo.gif"></CENTER>  <P><CENTER><IMG SRC="foo.gif"></CENTER>
 <P><I>Figure A-1: <A NAME="73085"></A></I>  <P><I>Figure A-1: <A NAME="73085"></A></I>

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